Marielle Nitoslawska's Selected Bibliography:






Essential Reading:


Altman, Rick. Sound Theory, Sound Practice. New York: Routledge, 1992.
A book built around a series of new essays by Rick Altman, as well as new essays by other established figures, such as John Belton, Michel Chion and Alan Williams, and a new generation of sound sensitive scholars, attempting to renew the debate over the importance of sound to cinema.


Chion, Michel. Audio-Vision: Sound on Screen. Claudia Gorbman, trans. New York: Columbia University Press, 1994 (Forward by Walter Murch - vii-xxiv)
———. Le son au cinéma. Paris : Editions de l'Étoile, 1985.

Kahn, Douglas. Noise, Water, Meat: A History of Sound in the Arts. MIT Press, 1999.
This interdisciplinary history and theory of sound in the arts reads the twentieth century through the emphatic and exceptional sounds of modernism and those on the cusp of postmodernism. Focusing on Europe in the first half of the century and the United States in the postwar years, Kahn explores aural activities in literature, music, visual arts, theater, and film.

LoBruto, Vincent. Sound-On-Film: Interviews with Creators of Film Sound. Westport: Praeger, 1994.
Sound-On-Film contains interviews with 27 prominent men and women who discuss their careers and the art and craft of film sound. These sound creators represent many of the crafts working in film sound, including production sound, sound editing, sound design, additional dialogue replacement (ADR), Foley, re-recording mixing, and sound engineering.

Sitney, P. Adams, ed. The Avant-Garde Film: A Reader of Theory and Criticism. Anthology Film Archives Series: 3. New York: New York University Press, 1978. (Brakhage, Stan. “Letter to Ronna Page (On Music).” 134-138)

Sobchack, Thomas & Vivian. “Historical Overview: The Development of Sound” and “Film Sound.” An Introduction to Film. 2nd ed. New York: Longman, 1987: 163-202.


Weis, Elizabeth and John Belton, eds. Film Sound Theory and Practice. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985.
This anthology collects essays by the most respected film historians, aestheticians, and theorists of the past sixty years and provides useful models for the analysis of sound stylistics in the form of case studies of a number of the most important sound films ever made.

Whitney, John & James. “Audio-Visual Music.” The Avant-Garde Film: A Reader of Theory and Criticism. Anthology Film Archives Series: 3. P. Adams Sitney, ed. New York: New York University Press, 1978: 83-86.
A discussion of the Whitney brother's process of incorporating 'synthetic' sound with their animated films. Considering the relationship of form to technique, acknowledging cinema as an art fundamentally related to the machine - and thus having created their own sound generating apparatus - they describe their preference for the new rhythmic possibilities of scoring based on divisible fractions of the film frame in order to create sounds that do not carry the 'distractions' of previously composed music.


Bibliography:


Abel, Richard + Rick Altman, eds. The Sounds of Early Cinema. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2001.

Altman, Rick. Sound Theory, Sound Practice. New York: Routledge, 1992.
A book built around a series of new essays by Rick Altman, as well as new essays by other established figures, such as John Belton, Michel Chion and Alan Williams, and a new generation of sound sensitive scholars, attempting to renew the debate over the importance of sound to cinema.


Bordwell, David. “The Musical Analogy.” Yale French Studies. No. 60.1980: 141-156

Chion, Michel. Audio-Vision: Sound on Screen. Claudia Gorbman, trans. New York: Columbia University Press, 1994 (Forward by Walter Murch - vii-xxiv)
———. Le son au cinéma. Paris : Editions de l'Étoile, 1985.
———. La toile trouée. Paris : Editions de l'Étoile, 1988.
———. David Lynch. Robert Julian, trans. London: BFI, 1995.

Gardner, Kay. Sounding the Inner Landscape: Music as Medicine. Stonington: Caduceus
Publications, 1990.

Helmholtz, Hermann. On the Sensations of Tone as a Physiological Basis for the Theory of Music. 2nd English ed. Alexander J. Ellis, trans. New York: Dover Publications Inc.,1954.

Jousse, Thierry. “Godard a l’Oreille.” Cahiers du Cinéma. No. 437 (Nov. 1990) pp. 40-43.

Kahn, Douglas. Noise, Water, Meat: A History of Sound in the Arts. MIT Press, 1999.
This interdisciplinary history and theory of sound in the arts reads the twentieth century through the emphatic and exceptional sounds of modernism and those on the cusp of postmodernism. Focusing on Europe in the first half of the century and the United States in the postwar years, Douglas Kahn explores aural activities in literature, music, visual arts, theater, and film. Artists discussed include George Brecht, William Burroughs, John Cage, Sergei Eisenstein, Jackson Pollock, Jack Kerouac and Luis Bunuel.

Kittler, Friedrich A. Gramophone, Film, Typewriter. Geoffrey Winthrop-Young and Michael Wutz, trans. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999.

Lastra, James. Sound Technology and the American Cinema. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

LoBruto, Vincent. Sound-On-Film: Interviews with Creators of Film Sound. Westport: Praeger, 1994.
Sound-On-Film contains interviews with 27 prominent men and women who discuss their careers and the art and craft of film sound. These sound creators represent many of the crafts working in film sound, including production sound, sound editing, sound design, additional dialogue replacement (ADR), Foley, re-recording mixing, and sound engineering. The book details the sound design of many highly acclaimed and seminal films, including Star Wars, The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, Raging Bull, and Terminator 2. In addition, it contains biographical background and a selected filmography of each sound creator as well as a glossary of terms and bibliography for future study.

Morgan, David. Knowing the Score. New York: Harper-Collins, 2000.

Morton, David. Off the Record: The Technology and Culture of Sound Recording in America. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2000.

Oliveros, Pauline. “Acoustic and Virtual Space as a Dynamic Element in Music.” The Roots of the Moment. New York: Drogue Press, 1998: 3-22.

Prendergast, Roy M. Film Music: A Neglected Art. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1977.

Rossing, Thomas D. The Science of Sound. 2nd ed. Reading: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.,
1990.

Ruoff, Jeffrey K. “Conventions of Sound in Documentary.” Sound Theory, Sound Practice. Rick Altman, ed. New York: Routledge, 1992: 217-234.
This essay draws comparisons between various examples of sound practices and narration in the documentary tradition, focusing primarily on synchronous sound observational films from the 1960s and 1970s, in particular the 1973 PBS series An American Family.

Sharits, Paul. “Hearing: Seeing.” The Avant-Garde Film: A Reader of Theory and Criticism. Anthology Film Archives Series: 3. P. Adams Sitney, ed. New York: New York University Press, 1978: 255-260.

Sherburne, Philip. “Sound Art/Sound Bodies.” Parachute. No. 107: 68-79.

Sitney, P. Adams, ed. The Avant-Garde Film: A Reader of Theory and Criticism. Anthology Film Archives Series: 3. New York: New York University Press, 1978. (Brakhage, Stan. “Letter to Ronna Page (On Music).” 134-138)

Sobchack, Thomas & Vivian. “Historical Overview: The Development of Sound” and “Film Sound.” An Introduction to Film. 2nd ed. New York: Longman, 1987: 163-202.

Théberge, Paul. Any Sound you can Imagine: Making Music/Consuming Technology.
Hanover: University Press of New England, 1997.

Toop, David. Ocean of Sound: Aether Talk, Ambient Sound and Imaginary Worlds. New York: Serpent’s Tail, 1995.

Weis, Elizabeth and John Belton, eds. Film Sound Theory and Practice. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985.
This anthology collects essays by the most respected film historians, aestheticians, and theorists of the past sixty years and provides useful models for the analysis of sound stylistics in the form of case studies of a number of the most important sound films ever made.

Whitney, John H. Digital Harmony: On the Complementarity of Music and Visual Art.
Peterborough, New Hampshire: McGraw-Hill, 1980.

Whitney, John + James. “Audio-Visual Music.” The Avant-Garde Film: A Reader of Theory and Criticism. Anthology Film Archives Series: 3. P. Adams Sitney, ed. New York: New York University Press, 1978: 83-86.
A discussion of the Whitney brother's process of incorporating 'synthetic' sound with their animated films. Considering the relationship of form to technique, acknowledging cinema as an art fundamentally related to the machine - and thus having created their own sound generating apparatus - they describe their preference for the new rhythmic possibilities of scoring based on divisible fractions of the film frame in order to create sounds that do not carry the 'distractions' of previously composed music. Citing Duchamp and Mondrian they describe their desire to find a new equilibrium to the acceptable employment of the machine.

Wojcik, Pamela Robertson & Arthur Knight, eds. Soundtrack Available. Durham: Duke University Press, 2001.

Yale French Studies: Cinema/Sound. No. 60. 1980.